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Mount Holly

Mount Holly

Washington County

Located in Washington County, Mount Holly was built in 1858 for Margaret Johnson Erwin Dudley, daughter of Henry Johnson, one of the largest early landholders in the Delta. In the 1880s, ownership transferred to William Hezekiah Foote and Huger Lew Foote, prominent planters and politicians. During the Mississippi River flood of 1927 Mount Holly was used as headquarters for relief committees.

Mount Holly is a large, asymmetrical two-story, common-bond brick structure consisting of approximately 30 rooms. One of the few remaining antebellum houses of mansion scale in the Delta, this rural Italianate villa was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. The design of the house was based on a published design by Calvert Vaux. Along with Ammadelle in Oxford – also designed by Vaux – Mount Holly is one of the state’s best examples of the Italian villa style of architecture. The main entrance to Mount Holly is through a Palladian type archway in the center pavilion projecting from the facade. The exterior is also characterized by semi-hexagonal windows with carved lintels; wooden balustrades and a balcony railing of iron grillwork; regularly spaced pairs of brackets visually supporting overhanging eaves; and prominent chimneys further emphasized by paneled stucco and brick dentils.

Currently, Mount Holly is unoccupied and suffers from the damages of neglect by an absentee owner. Attempts by groups and individuals to reach out to the owner to either assist with the buildings preservation or to seek information about purchasing the property have, so far, gone mostly unanswered while this important antebellum house sits deteriorating.

2015 Update – Lost

Left open to the elements and easy prey for vandals, Mount Holly was engulfed by fire on July 17, 2015.

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