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Holtzclaw Mansion

Holtzclaw Mansion

Utica, Hinds County

The Holtzclaw Mansion is the last remnant of the Utica Normal and Industrial Institute for Colored Women and Men founded in 1903 by William Holtzclaw. Holtzclaw was born in 1870 in Roanoke, Alabama to illiterate sharecroppers. At the age of 20 William left to attend the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute and study under Booker T. Washington.

After three failed attempts to open a school in Mississippi, Holtzclaw opened the Utica Normal and Industrial Institute for Colored Women and Men in a one-room cabin. The school grew and in 1907 Holtzclaw raised the funds necessary to purchase land about five miles south of Utica for a new campus. Around 1915 Holtzclaw developed his plans for the Holtzclaw Mansion and it is believed that student and community labor helped construct the house. The Holtzclaw Mansion is vernacular in style with Greek Revival, Colonial Revival, Victorian and Classical influences. The large two-story building was constructed of brick with a gable front and a one-story porch that wraps around both sides of the house. The house has sixteen rooms and was used as the residence for Holtzclaw’s family, as classrooms, and for special events.

In 1943, Holtzclaw passed away and his son occupied the house until 1946 when the Mansion was used as the Ginn Line Elementary School. The elementary school closed in 1966 and in 1982 Holtzclaw’s college became a campus for Hinds County Community College.

The Mansion, designated a Mississippi Landmark, is the last building left from Holtzclaw’s College and unfortunately Hinds County Community College has no use for the Mansion which has been left to deteriorate. The rear of the building has collapsed and without stabilization or a plan to rehabilitate the building this very important building constructed by an important African American educator could be lost forever.

 

2017 Update – Lost

The Holtzclaw Mansion on the Utica campus of Hinds County Community College was demolished in 2014.

 

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